World's TopList

Top 10 fastest Birds in the World

Birds are a group of warm-blooded vertebrates constituting the class Aves, characterized by feathers, toothless beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a strong yet lightweight skeleton. The peregrine falcon is the fastest bird, and the fastest member of the animal kingdom, with a diving speed of 389 km/h (242 mph).

1. Peregrine falcon (Duck Hawk)
The peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus), also known as the peregrine and historically as the duck hawk in North America is a widespread bird of prey (raptor) in the family Falconidae. A large, crow-sized falcon, it has a blue-grey back, barred white underparts, and a black head. The peregrine is renowned for its speed, reaching over 320 km/h (200 mph) during its characteristic hunting stoop (high-speed dive), making it the fastest bird in the world, as well as the fastest member of the animal kingdom. According to a National Geographic TV program, the highest measured speed of a peregrine falcon is 389 km/h (242 mph).

2. Golden Eagle
The golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is one of the best-known birds of prey in the Northern Hemisphere. It is the most widely distributed species of eagle. Like all eagles, it belongs to the family Accipitridae. These birds are dark brown, with lighter golden-brown plumage on their napes. Immature eagles of this species typically have white on the tail and often have white markings on the wings. Golden eagles use their agility and speed combined with powerful feet and massive, sharp talons to snatch up a variety of prey, mainly hares, rabbits, and marmots and other ground squirrels.

Golden eagles maintain home ranges or territories that may be as large as 200 km2 (77 sq mi).

3. White-throated Needletail
The white-throated needletail (Hirundapus caudacutus), also known as needle-tailed swift or spine-tailed swift, is a large swift in the genus Hirundapus. It is reputed to reach speeds of up to 170 km/h (105 mph) in horizontal flight, but this is unverified because the methods used to measure its speed have not been published.

They build their nests in rock crevices in cliffs or hollow trees. They do not like to sit on the ground and spend most of their time in the air. They feed on small, flying insects like beetles, flies, bees and moths.

The white-throated needletail is a migratory bird, breeding in Central Asia and southern Siberia, and wintering south in the Indian Subcontinent, Southeast Asia and Australia.

4. Eurasian hobby
The Eurasian hobby (Falco subbuteo), or just simply hobby, is a small, slim falcon. It belongs to a rather close-knit group of similar falcons often considered a subgenus Hypotriorchis. This species breeds across Africa, Europe and Asia. It is a long-distance migrant, wintering in Africa and Asia.

5. Frigatebirds
Frigatebirds are a family of seabirds called Fregatidae which are found across all tropical and subtropical oceans. The five extant species are classified in a single genus, Fregata. All have predominantly black plumage, long, deeply forked tails and long hooked bills. Females have white underbellies and males have a distinctive red gular pouch, which they inflate during the breeding season to attract females. Their wings are long and pointed and can span up to 2.3 metres (7.5 ft), the largest wing area to body weight ratio of any bird.

6. Rock Dove
The rock dove, rock pigeon, or common pigeon is a member of the bird family Columbidae (doves and pigeons).

The domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica, which includes about 1,000 different breeds) descended from this species. Escaped domestic pigeons have increased the populations of feral pigeons around the world.

Wild rock doves are pale grey with two black bars on each wing, whereas domestic and feral pigeons vary in colour and pattern. Few differences are seen between males and females. The species is generally monogamous, with two squabs (young) per brood. Both parents care for the young for a time.

7. Spur-winged Goose
The spur-winged goose (Plectropterus gambensis) is a large bird in the family Anatidae, related to the geese and the shelducks, but distinct from both of these in a number of anatomical features, and therefore treated in its own subfamily, the Plectropterinae. It occurs in wetlands throughout sub-Saharan Africa.

8. Red-breasted merganser
The red-breasted merganser (Mergus serrator) is a diving duck, one of the sawbills. The genus name is a Latin word used by Pliny and other Roman authors to refer to an unspecified waterbird, and serrator is a sawyer from Latin serra, “saw”.

9. Gyrfalcon
The gyrfalcon, the largest of the falcon species, is a bird of prey. It breeds on Arctic coasts and tundra, and the islands of northern North America and the Eurosiberian region.

10. Grey-headed albatross
The grey-headed albatross (Thalassarche chrysostoma) also known as the grey-headed mollymawk, is a large seabird from the albatross family. It has a circumpolar distribution, nesting on isolated islands in the Southern Ocean and feeding at high latitudes, further south than any of the other mollymawks. Its name derives from its ashy-grey head, throat and upper neck.

Animal Maximum recorded speed
Peregrine falcon (घुमन्तु बाज) 389 km/h (242 mph)
Golden eagle (सुनहरा बाज़) 240–320 km/h (150–200 mph)
White-throated needletail 169 km/h (105 mph)
Eurasian hobby 160 km/h (100 mph)
Frigatebird 153 km/h (95 mph)
Rock dove (pigeon) 148.9 km/h (92.5 mph)
Spur-winged goose 142 km/h (88 mph)
Red-breasted merganser 129 km/h (80 mph)
Gyrfalcon 128 km/h (80 mph)
Grey-headed albatross 127 km/h (79 mph)

 

Source: Wikipedia

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